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Minima, DFF, and SolutionTemplate/E-Book now in Subversion

I've recently realized how lame it is to have to download a new ZIP file each file a new version of a framework is released or when a project has some changes. So, I'm moving my projects to Subversion instead of making everyone download my ZIP files. This should help me update the projects more often and allow everyone else to get my projects easier. Please note that this replaces all RAR/ZIP files I've previously released.

Currently, I have the following projects in Subversion:

  • Minima
  • Data Feed Framework
  • NetFXHarmonics .NET SolutionTemplate With E-Book

You can access these projects with any Subversion client, though you would probably want to use TortoiseSVN for Windows development. You can access the projects at the following SVN HTTP addresses. You are free to also use these SVN HTTP locations to browse through the code in your web browser. My primary emphasis is in .NET training and education, so I do hope this helps. Also, given that my SolutionTemplate is also my e-book, you can easily look at the files there and read them online without having to download the project.

Note the /trunk/ path at the end. There are currently no projects in the tags section of the Subversion repository and, honestly, I'm still planning what to do with that section. The branches section is currently set to not allow anonymous access.

By the way, if you're unfamiliar with it, Subversion is an incredibly powerful and seamlessly easy to use revision control system that allows for code repositories (that is, code stores) to be stored in a centralized local to allow access from diverse locations. Subversion also does automatic versioning of your commits (that is, saves) to the code repository. Not just versioning as in a magic number change, but also as in it saves all versions of your files so you can go back and see your changes over time.

Subversion is used for many different reasons and some of them have nothing to do with code. For example, I've been using something similar to it (CVS) for a rather long time now to store all my documents so I can keep everything stored in a centralized location and so I can see the progress of my work. One use that I found rather interesting was that one company was using Subversion to store and provision new instances of their application. So, you can use it as a place to store your code, as a global file system, or as an application repository. Subversion stores whatever you want to store, including binary files. For more information on Subversion, see the online O'Reilly e-book "Version Control with Subversion" below.

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