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Simplified Universal HttpHandlerFactory Technique

A few months ago I wrote about the Universal HttpHandlerFactory Technique where you have one HttpHandlerFactory that all your ASP.NET processing goes through and then in that HttpHandlerFactory you then choose what HttpHandler is returned based upon what directory or file is accessed.  I still like this approach for certain scenarios, but my blog got to the point where I was managing 11 different HttpHandlers for about 25 different path and file patterns.  So, it was time to simplify.

What I came up with was basically my go to card for everything: put it in SQL Server.  From there I just checked the URL being accessed against the patterns in a database table and then looked up what HttpHandler to use for that particular request.  Then, of course, I cached the HttpHandler for future file access.

Here are my SQL Server tables (yes, I do all my design in T-SQL-- SQL GUI tricks are for kids):

create table dbo.HttpHandlerMatchType  (
HttpHandlerMatchTypeId int primary key identity not null,
HttpHandlerMatchTypeName varchar(200) not null
) 

insert HttpHandlerMatchType select 'Contains'
insert HttpHandlerMatchType select 'Starts With'
insert HttpHandlerMatchType select 'Ends With'
insert HttpHandlerMatchType select 'Default'

create table dbo.HttpHandler (
HttpHandlerId int primary key identity not null,
HttpHandlerMatchTypeId int foreign key references HttpHandlerMatchType(HttpHandlerMatchTypeId),
HttpHandlerName varchar(300),
HttpHandlerMatchText varchar(200)
) 

Here is the data in the HttpHandler table:

 HttpHandler Table

Looking at this image and the SQL Server code, you can see that I'm matching the URL in different ways.  Sometimes I want to use a certain HttpHandler if the URL simply contains the text in the HttpHandlerMatchText and other times I'll want to see if it the URL ends with it.  I included an option for "starts with" as well, which I may use in the future.  This will allow me to have better control of how paths and files are processed.  Also, notice that one is "base".  This is a special one that basically means that the following HttpHandler will be used (keep in mind we are in a class that inherits from the PageHandlerFactory class-- please see my original blog entry):

base.GetHandler(context, requestType, url, pathTranslated);

Now in my HttpHandlerFactory's GetHandler method I'm doing something like this (also note how LLBLGen Pro helps me simply my database access):

HttpHandlerCollection hc = new HttpHandlerCollection( );
hc.GetMulti(new PredicateExpression(HttpHandlerFields.HttpHandlerMatchTypeId != 4));

IHttpHandler hh = null;
foreach (HttpHandlerEntity h in hc) {
    hh = MatchHttpHandler(absoluteUrl, h.HttpHandlerName.ToLower( ), h.HttpHandlerMatchTypeId, h.HttpHandlerMatchText.ToLower( ));
    if (hh != null) {
        break;
    }
}

This is basically just going to look through all the HttpHandlers in the table which are not the "default" handler (which will be used when there is no match).  The MatchHttpHandler method basically just passes the buck to another method depending of whether I'm matching the URL based on Contains, StartsWith, or EndsWith.

private IHttpHandler MatchHttpHandler(String url, String name, Int32 typeId, String text) {
    IHttpHandler h = null;
    switch (typeId) {
        case 1:
            h = MatchContains(url, name, text);
            break;

        case 2:
            h = MatchStartsWith(url, name, text);
            break;

        case 3:
            h = MatchEndsWith(url, name, text);
            break;

        default:
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Invalid HttpHandlerTypeId");
    }

    return h;
}

Here is an example of one of these methods; the others are similiar:

private IHttpHandler MatchContains(String url, String name, String text) {
    if (url.Contains(text)) {
        return GetHttpHandler(name);
    }
    return null;
}

As you can see, it's nothing fancy.  The last method in the chain is the GetHttpHandler, which is basically a factory method that converts text into an HttpHandler object:

private IHttpHandler GetHttpHandler(String text) {
    switch (text) {
        case "base":
            return new MinimaBaseHttpHandler( );

        case "defaulthttphandler":
            return new DefaultHttpHandler( );

        case "minimaapihttphandler":
            return new MinimaApiHttpHandler( );

        case "minimafeedhttphandler":
            return new MinimaFeedHttpHandler( );

        case "minimafileprocessorhttphandler":
            return new MinimaFileProcessorHttpHandler( );

        case "minimapingbackhttphandler":
            return new MinimaPingbackHttpHandler( );

        case "minimasitemaphttphandler":
            return new MinimaSiteMapHttpHandler( );

        case "minimatrackbackhttphandler":
            return new MinimaTrackBackHttpHandler( );

        case "minimaurlprocessinghttphandler":
            return new MinimaUrlProcessingHttpHandler( );

        case "projectsyntaxhighlighterhttphandler":
            return new ProjectSyntaxHighlighterHttpHandler( );

        case "xmlrpcapi":
            return new XmlRpcApi( );

        default:
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Unknown HttpHandler in HttpHandlerMatchText");
    }
}

There is one thing in this that stands out:

case "base":
    return new MinimaBaseHttpHandler( );

If the "base" is simply a call to base.GetHandler, then why am I doing this?  Honestly, I just didn't want to pass around all the required parameters for that method call.  So, to make things a bit more elegant I created a blank HttpHandler called MinimaBaseHttpHandler that did absolutely nothing.  After the original iteration through the HttpHandlerCollection is finished, I then do the following (it's just a trick to the logic more consistent):

if (hh is MinimaBaseHttpHandler) {
    return base.GetHandler(context, requestType, url, pathTranslated);
}
else if(hh != null){
    if (!handlerCache.ContainsKey(absoluteUrl)) {
        handlerCache.Add(absoluteUrl, hh);
    }
    return hh;
}

One thing I would like to mention is something that that sample alludes to: I'm not constantly having everything run through this process, but I am caching the URL to HttpHandler mappings.  To accomplish this, I simply setup a simple cached dictionary to map URLs to their appropriate HttpHandlers:

static Dictionary<String, IHttpHandler> handlerCache = new Dictionary<String, IHttpHandler>( );

Before ANY of the above happens, I check to see if the URL to HttpHandler mapping exists and if it does, then return it:

if (handlerCache.ContainsKey(absoluteUrl)) {
    return handlerCache[absoluteUrl];
}

This way, URLs can be processed without having to touch the database (of course ASP.NET caching helps with performance as well).

Related Links

All my work in this area has been rolled-up into my Themelia ASP.NET Framework, which is freely available on CodePlex. See that for another example of this technique.